SOFT&GREEN UN Sustainable Development Goals

When social responsibility is territorial



Although the definition of local social responsibility is relatively new, the goal that every community should have is certainly not new: improving the quality of life of the people who live there, taking into account the environmental, social and economic perspective.



What does it mean for a territory to be responsible?

Today, starting a path towards local social responsibility means first asking ourselves about the future from a sustainable development perspective, as Sustainable Development Goal 11 of Agenda 2030 reminds us (make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable). This path requires the cooperation of everyone.




A question of responsibility.

If words such as efficiency, competitiveness, sustainability and innovation are part, for better or worse, of companies’ day-to-day operational horizon, it must also be the case in the relationship that public bodies have with their local territories. In other words, responding to contemporary challenges requires a multi-stakeholder approach involving the joint commitment of governments, businesses, associations and citizens. To do this, it is necessary to replace the bureaucratic compliance approach with an approach geared to results and consider citizens not merely as passive users but as active customers who express their needs and expectations and want quality solutions.



Focus on the individual.

All public and private organisations are made up of people, which is why it is important to start with individual responsibility. The word responsibility comes from the Latin verb respondere, which literally means to respond. Being responsible means being accountable for our actions and therefore acting while evaluating the consequences of our behaviour. Only in this way does responsibility become a practical action.





ARTICLES

Help from citizens
In many Italian cities, people decide to organise themselves to improve the territory where they live and work. Until a few years ago, this choice could create problems for citizens who wanted to rearrange a public garden, paint a school or organise a playground.When the law says no. In the past, rolling up your s...

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Green kilometre, work in progress
The A1 motorway (Milan – Rome – Naples) was one of the great development tools for the Italian economy. However, this factor has also led to some problems over time. Environmental problems, for example. In the Po Valley section of the motorway 20% of the pollution comes from particulate matter, and the High Speed R...

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A new type of zero kilometre
Let’s imagine that we are in a restaurant and that we are offered a zero kilometre menu. In addition to the advantage of eating food that has had presumably shorter transport and storage times, we are also convinced that what is under our eyes is more “easily monitored”.A measurable relationship. A similar p...

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Skiing on waste becomes a reality in Copenhagen
Can a waste disposal facility become a tourist attraction for a city? In Copenhagen, it looks like it can. The new city waste-to-energy plant houses a ski slope, a 27-metre artificial climbing wall, a restaurant and a café surrounded by trees.When waste is cutting-edge. The Amager Bakke-Copenhill, a waste-to-ener...

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Redeveloping the territory: from the suburbs to urban centres
To date, the issue of urban regeneration has mainly involved the suburbs of large metropolises. But even the city centre sometimes needs to be revitalised. In this sense, Bologna’s experience is very interesting. In the past, Bologna was well known for its careful policy for city centre management. The Fondazione per...

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